Up: Limited edition, super clean, those wheels doe

Down: It’s not done yet!

Neutral: One of the best looking Scion FR-S’s on the road.

In a world where cars are safer, better performing, and better equipped every day, it’s hard to see a purpose in modding anymore. All of that sweet tech and cool stickers you would have normally purchased for your ’89 Honda Civic all come standard nowadays.┬áTake this new Scion for instance. Premium sound system with touch screen? Already got it. Performance shocks and springs with disc brakes? Got that too. 6-speed transmission, dual exhaust, and 17″ rims? Check, check, and check. So why on Earth would anyone want to throw more money at a car anymore?

Well the answer is still as simple today as it was in yesteryear; to make it your own. My good friend Jason owns this 2013 Scion FR-S 10 Series and every piece of customization he’s put on is meticulously thought out. From the wheels to the exhaust to the interior the goal is crystal clear: make this car my own without sabotaging the balance the manufacturer intended. And really, that’s the way it should be done.

Let’s start with the car itself. This isn’t any old Scion FR-S, it’s a super limited 10-series so right off the bat it’s pretty unique. The “10” stands for Scion making it ten years in the game and they wanted to make something special. You can tell a 10-Series driver a mile away because they’ll be the only FR-S with Silver Ignition paint and daytime running LED lights. On the inside you get dual-zone climate control and a sweet push-to-start button. There are other goodies too but the coup de grace is the illuminated Scion logo on the nose and the back lit “SCION” on the dash when you power down the car. Yeah, most people will call it cheesy, but only because they don’t have it.

2013 Scion FR-S 10 Series-15

As for modifications Jason has made, there’s a fat list that I’ll include on the bottom of the article. The “points of interest,” however, really make this car stand out. We’ll start with the bigger and wider Gram Light 57Xtremes that may look black at first but in the right light you can see they are a beautiful ‘Winning Blue’ color. These look right at home on the FR-S and give it a wider stance. The exhaust, which was actually put on the night before we went out, is a Nameless front pipe paired with an Invidia catback that is quiet while cruising and mean when you put your foot down. A perfect combo. There are also better springs, a cold air intake, and a short shifter that help bring the performance out just a little more. It’s all like I said before, solid improvements while still maintaining the balance.

In a nutshell, the work done on this car is is completely complimenting. There is no gigantic Ebay wing, no PVC intake pipe, and definitely no slam bags. Everything maintains the stock look of the car, which is already fantastic, while improving on the little things that could make every mass produced car look and feel better. So the moral of the story is to keep modding your cars. It’s not like you drive them every day so why wouldn’t you make them your own?


 

Mod list:

  • 18×8.5/9.5 +33/+40 Gram Light 57 Xtremes
  • 225/40-18 & 255/35-18 Continental Extreme Contact DWS
  • Rays red center caps
  • Project Kics Revo R40 locking lug nuts
  • Eibach Sportline Spring
  • Nameless front pipe/over pipe
  • Invidia Q300 cat back exhaust
  • Supertek intake tube and filter
  • Supertek carbon hood dampers
  • TWM short shifter
  • Perrin rear shifter bushing
  • Whiteline gearbox positive shift kit
  • MTEC shift springs
  • TRD shift knob
  • Weather tech floor mats
  • Flagnorfail

Comments

comments